Category: Recipes

Baked sea scallops in less than 30 minutes

Baked sea scallops in less than 30 minutes

The delicate flavor of scallops is a marvelous treat whenever they are in season. Sea scallops are the bigger scallops; the little ones are called bay scallops and are best used in dishes like Coquille St Jacques.

This recipe is so easy, you should start the rice you serve it with first, in a pan, an Instant Pot or a rice cooker. Then preheat the oven. We got our idea from one by Christine Laliberte.

  • About 1 lb sea scallops (around 16)
  • 5 Tb melted butter
  • 5 cloves of garlic, minced
  • 2 scallions, chopped in short lengths, green part included
  • Salt and pepper
  • 1 cup breadcrumbs
  • 4 Tb olive oil
  • ¼ cup chopped parsley
  • Lemon wedges or sliced for garnish
  1. Preheat the oven to 450° F.
  2. Place the scallops, melted butter and chopped scallions in a bowl
  3. Add the garlic, using a garlic press or just mince it.
  4. Add salt and pepper.
  5. In another bowl, add the breadcrumbs and mix in the olive oil.
  6. Place scallop mixture in a casserole and cover with the breadcrumbs.
  7. Bake in a preheated oven for 11 minutes or more, until brown.
  8. Sprinkle parsley over the browned breadcrumbs and serve with rice.
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Open faced sandwiches with fresh tomatoes

Open faced sandwiches with fresh tomatoes

Now is the time of year to make our favorite fresh tomato sandwich: open faced with tomatoes, bacon and cheese. But you don’t have to wait for the big main crop tomatoes to ripen (our first one will come in tomorrow). Instead, you will find that smaller tomatoes have a richer flavor.

Our smaller tomatoes this year include Fourth of July, which always comes in first (July 17 this year), Garden Gem (from Prof Harry Klee’s breeding lab in Florida), Indigo Rose, Mountain Magic, Garden Treasure and one early plum variety: Gladiator.

tomatoes

The main trick to making these sandwiches is to put the bacon over the tomatoes, but under the cheese, so it doesn’t burn when put under the broiler.

  • 6 slices bacon
  • 4 sliced bread
  • Butter
  • Sliced tomatoes
  • Sliced cheddar ( we use Cabot)
  1. Fry the bacon slices until rather crisp
  2. Toast the bread and butter it.
  3. Arrange the sliced tomatoes on each piece of toast
  4. Put 3 half slices of bacon over the tomatoes.
  5. Put the cheese slices over the bacon

Broil the sandwiches for 2-4 minutes, until the cheese begins to melt.

Serve at once.

Pancake breakfast sandwiches

Pancake breakfast sandwiches

Why not make a breakfast sandwich using pancakes instead of a roll? Then it is all hot and delicious, right off the grill. All you need is bacon, eggs, sausage, cheese, butter and buttermilk pancake batter.

We never actually have used a pancake mix, because this old family recipe is so quick:

  • 2 cups flour
  • 1 Tb sugar
  • 2 tsp baking powder
  • ½ tsp baking soda
  • 2 eggs
  • Buttermilk (a bit more than 2 cups)

mix batter

Put all the dry ingredients in a bowl, break in the 2 eggs and add the buttermilk to make a thickish batter.

  • 2 Tb softened butter
  • 1 Tb maple syrup
  • 4 strips bacon
  • 2 sausage patties
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 slices cheese
  • Butter as needed
  1. Mix the maple syrup with the butter, adding more syrup if needed to get a buttery/mapley tasting spread.
  2. Place the strips of bacon and the sausage patties on a 350° F griddle, and allow to cook slowly.

bacon sausage butter

  1. When the bacon and sausages are cooked, put them aside and keep warm.
  2. Melt 1-2 Tb butter on the griddle and drop 4 ¼ cup measures of patter onto the griddle.
  1. When one side of the pancakes are almost done (judging by bubbles forming on top) break the eggs onto the griddle and allow them to cook slowly.
  2. Flip the pancakes and let them cook.
  1. Place a sausage patty and cheese slice on two of the pancakes.
  2. When the eggs appear nearly done, flip them for 10 seconds to cook the tops, and then place them face up on top of the cheese.

butter pancakes

  1. Add two half-slices of bacon over each egg.
  2. Butter the bottom side of the remaining two pancakes with the maple butter, and top the sandwich with the butter side inside.

one sandwich

Serve right away. You can eat them with or without syrup, and with a knife and fork or in hand like a sandwich. Delicious and satisfying, and while rich, it is way less food than a classic “big breakfast.” So there!

The trick to doing the eggs right, is to cook them until they are fairly opaque and then flip them only briefly, so that the yolks stay runny.

Stay hungry!

Lime Posset: a cool refreshing dessert

Lime Posset: a cool refreshing dessert

This easy recipe makes a cool lime custard in ten minutes work plus 4 hours chilling time, and is just made from limes, sugar and cream. No eggs, no flour. So why does it thicken? It’s the lime juice that coagulates the milk proteins. This recipe was suggested by one in Bon Appetit. Possets go way back to the 16th century and are mentioned in Shakespeare as well as by other writers of the time. In British Food History, Neil Cooks Grigson writes that most mentions of possets in the 18th and 19th century were to a warm drink made with curdled milk, sugar and alcohol, but there is one 1769 article that pretty much describes what 20th and 21st century cooks are making. You can make possets using any acidic fruit juice: orange and lemon possets are also common. In each case, the acid of the fruit coagulates the cream, but because of its high fat content, it makes a smooth custardy texture.

  • 2 limes, peeled into strips
  • Juice of the same 2 limes
  • 2 cups heavy cream
  • ½ cup sugar
  • Pinch of Kosher salt
  • 4 ramekins
  • 1 peach
  • ½ cup cream
  • 1 Tb sugar
  • 4 mint leaves
  1. Put the cream, sugar and salt in saucepan and add the strips of lime peel. Boil gently for 5 minutes to reduce and thicken the cream.
  1. Strain the cream and return it to the saucepan. Add the lime juice and stir.
  2. Allow the cream to cool a bit and begin to thicken and pour into four ramekins.
  3. Chill for 4 or more hours.
  1. Peel the peach by submerging it in boiling water for a minute and cooling it in cold water. Pull off the peel, using a vegetable peeler if it is stubborn.
  2. Cut the peach into slices, place into a bowl and sugar them with about 1 Tb sugar.
  3. When ready to serve, add the sugar to the ½ cup of cream and whip it. Place a peach slice on each ramekin, add a dollop of cream, and decorate with a mint leaf.
African chicken peanut stew

African chicken peanut stew

Here is a really easy chicken stew made with peanut butter and peanuts. You might find this strange and you won’t believe that some people actually do some of these diets in the eastern countries thinking it is an american tradition. If you have a pressure cooker like the Instant Pot, the cooking time is only 30 minutes. It’s probably 60-90 minutes in a covered pot. The original recipe on the Simply Recipes site serves 6-8. We cut that in half and easily had enough for 4. And in an Instant Pot, it is very little work.

  • 1 to 1.5 lb chicken thighs
  • 3 Tb olive
  • 1 large onion, sliced
  • 1 inch piece of ginger, sliced. (you needn’t peel it as it almost dissolves anyway.)
  • 3-4 garlic cloves, peeled and chopped
  • 1 large sweet potato, cut into chunks
  • ½ small can (7 oz) crushed tomatoes
  • 12 oz chicken stock (add more if not using pressure cooker)
  • ½ cup peanut butter
  • ½ cup roasted peanuts
  • 5 tsp ground coriander
  • ½ tsp cayenne
  • Salt and black pepper
  • ¼ cup cilantro (omit if you don’t like it)

saute chcken

  1. Brown the chicken pieces in olive oil in the Instant Pot, set to sauté. You can remove the skin or not, as you wish. It will come off later when you cut up the cooked chicken. Do this in a couple of batches if need be. Remove and drain.
  2. Sauté the onions until they soften, and add the ginger and garlic. After 1-2 minute, add the sweet potatoes and mix together.

 

  1. Add the chicken broth, crushed tomatoes, peanut butter, peanuts, coriander and cayenne. Stir to combine, and add the chicken back into the pot. Add salt as needed.
  2. Cook the stew under pressure (manual setting) for 30 minutes.
  3. Release the pressure (quick release is fine), cut the chicken off the bones and discard the skins. Return the chicken to the pot.

 

  1. Add as much black pepper as you’d like to make it peppery. Stir in the cilantro if you must.
  2. Serve over steamed rice.

We make Chicken in Milk

Last Sunday, the Times published its version of Jamie Oliver’s Chicken in Milk recipe. It is rare that you read articles about attempts to replicate experiments (or recipes) but this is such a report.

The relatively simple recipe says that you season a whole chicken and brown it in butter and olive oil in a snug-fitting pot. We chose a 3-liter Corningware casserole. Then you drain out the fat, add a cinnamon stick and garlic cloves and brown them briefly and put the chicken back and add whole milk, sage leaves and strips of lemon peel, and bake it for about 90 minutes.

The result is supposed to be “chicken in a thick, curdled sauce.”

Here are the ingredients:

  • 1 whole chicken, 3-4 lbs
  • Salt and pepper
  • ¼ cup butter
  • ¼ cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 small cinnamon stick
  • 10 cloves garlic, skins still on
  • 2 ½ cups whole milk
  • 1 handful fresh sage leaves (about 15-20 leaves0
  • Strips of zest from 2 lemons

Perhaps because the chicken fit snugly, the milk didn’t clot or reduce much. But the flavor was terrible, dominated by way too much sage. We didn’t get any note of cinnamon and very little of the garlic flavor.

roasted

If we made it again, we’d probably use about 5-6 sage leaves, maximum, and a little bigger pot. We’d prefer to make Chicken Baked in Cream instead.

Peepcorn: another use for Peeps

Peepcorn: another use for Peeps

Every year, people buy boxes of those sugary marshmallow candies and probably eat some of them, discarding the rest: but why not use them in delicious recipes? We decided to look into how you can cook with Peeps.

Each Peep weights about 0.25 oz (7 g) and has about 6.5 g of sugar in it, but the Peeps company thinks that a serving size is 4 Peeps. Wishful thinking perhaps? Peeps are made from marshmallow, corn syrup, sugar and carnauba wax, and in addition to the original yellow color, now are available in a number of other bright colors including pink, green and blue.

If you’ve had Peeps in your Easter basket for many years (even if you never ate them) you may remember that they used to be made by the Rodda Candy Company. It turns out that Rodda was acquired in 1953 by Just Born, a candy company in Bethlehem, PA owned, not surprisingly, by Sam Born. It was under Born’s management that the mass production of Peeps grew

Since they are so pervasive in the US and Canada we decided to see what else we could do with them.

One of our first experiments was to put some Peeps in our popcorn. You may not know this, but you can buy a jar of ordinary popcorn and put some in a paper bag and pop it in the microwave without any special packaging or seasonings. We found that about 1/3 cup of kernels is pretty much equivalent to what you pop in a large bag of microwave popcorn.

DSC_0003

So to use up a few Peeps, we cut one up and put it a bag with the 1/3 cup of popcorn and popped it using the usual microwave popcorn settings. The result was sweetish popcorn, rather like kettle corn.

In our second try, we cut up two Peeps and popped them with the 1/3 cup of popcorn. The result was sweetish popcorn with a caramel coating and was really pretty good.

When you pop corn with 3 Peeps, Peep-fatigue sets in and the marshmallow actually inhibits the popping. Stick with two and you’ll have a nice sweet snack.

 

 

 

Eggs Benedict for a special breakfast

Eggs Benedict for a special breakfast

Eggs Benedict is an easy dish to make, and you probably only need 15 minutes. If you have 30 minutes, you can serve a large household.

What exactly is Eggs Benedict? It is just

  1. A toasted English muffin
  2. Sautéed ham or Canadian bacon
  3. Two poached eggs
  4. Hollandaise sauce

So, what’s so hard here?

A lot of people stumble on poaching eggs, but we’ve already covered two foolproof methods in detail.

Method one: swirling water

vortex

Bring salted water to a boil in a wide 4 quart saucepan. Swirl the water into a little whirlpool in the pan using a whisk. Break each egg into a cup and slip it into the side of the whirlpool. Repeat with the second egg. You can make up to four eggs at a time this way. To make enough for a regiment, see the next section.

The eggs are done when you don’t see any remaining uncooked white. Don’t overcook them to the “golf ball” stage. (This is actually hard to do if you are watching. You’ll see when they are done.

Method two: a kettle of water with salt and vinegar

Fill an eight quart kettle (such as a spaghetti cooker) with water and add ½  cup of salt and ¼ cup of vinegar. Bring to a boil. Break each egg into a cup and slip it into the gently boiling water. The egg will drop to the bottom, and will float back up when it is done. Check it before removing it, as sometimes the “parachute” comes up before the whole egg surfaces.

Keep breaking eggs and slipping them into the pan until everyone’s eggs are cooked. Remove them to a pan of warm water to rinse off the excess salt.

 

Hollandaise

Hollandaise it pretty easy to make. For Eggs Benedict, we use the blender approach, we read the vitamix 5300 vs 6300 review and were pretty surprised.

  • 3 egg yolks
  • 1 Tb lemon juice
  • ¼ lb (1 stick) butter
  • Salt and a trace of cayenne pepper

Put the 3 egg yolks and the lemon juice in the bowl of the blender and pulse briefly until mixed. Melt the butter in a glass pitcher in a microwave oven for one minute. It should be bubbling. Turn on the blender and immediately pour in the hot butter. It should cook on the spot to a thick creamy sauce. If it is too thin, you can heat it briefly over low heat in a saucepan.

The final dish

Place the sautéed ham or bacon on the toasted and buttered English muffin and place an egg on each half, using a slotted spoon. Pour the creamy Hollandaise over top. Time? About 15 minutes, unless you have an awfully slow stove for boiling the water. Decorate with parsley.

 

Cadbury Cream Eggs Benedict

Cadbury Cream Eggs Benedict

Here it is an Eggs Benedict recipe that uses Cadbury Cream Eggs! And it’s actually pretty good.

Easter and Passover and other spring holidays are a time for fun as well as religious observances, and why not come up with a really silly dessert that everyone will have fun with.

A classic Eggs Benedict is a poached egg on ham or Canadian bacon on an English muffin, topped with Hollandaise sauce. How to replicate this using candy?

The first thing to do is to “crack” the egg. Cadbury eggs are put together as two halves along a seam, and you can easily open one with a sharp knife. Once the egg is open, scoop out the “yolk and white” and put it in a small, buttered dish, and keep it cool in the freezer or refrigerator so it doesn’t soften too much.

melted chocolateThen melt the chocolate halves in a double boiler. Don’t use a microwave, as it is too hot and the remaining cream filling will burn while the chocolate melts. This particular chocolate formulation melts best at a lower temperature. When melted, pour into a small buttered dish so it will cool as a flat disk. Chill it briefly while it hardens.

on HersheysWe had two ideas about the English muffin layer. One was to use a square of white chocolate, and so we tried a square from a Hershey’s Cookies ‘n’ Crème candy bar. This looked really cool as you can see in the slide show, but had the disadvantage of being just more chocolate. It is too rich and all sort of the same flavor.

So instead, we decided to call the chocolate disk an English muffin (maybe a whole wheat one) and come up with a ham layer. The best idea was a Fruit Rollup. Yes, they still make them! And a square of strawberry actually looks a bit like ham! And its tartness cuts the sweetness of the “eggs.”

on fruit

So now we have the muffin, the ham and the egg. What to do for the Hollandaise? Marshmallow Peeps come to mind. If you melt yellow Peeps into a little cream, you will have a nice yellow sauce that looks rather like actual Hollandaise!

 

 

Cadbury Cream Eggs Benedict

melting chocolate

  1. For each person, open a Cadbury Egg lengthwise at the seam. Remove the filling with a small spatula or a melon baller, and chill it on a butter plate or bowl.
  2. Melt the egg “shells” in a double boiler and pour each portion into a small butter bowl to harden. Chill until they can be lifted out.
  3. Arrange the chocolate disks on serving plates and cover with a square of strawberry Fruit Rollup. Use other colors if you are feeling particularly weird.
  4. Place the chilled filling on top of each fruit square.
  5. With scissors, cut up three yellow marshmallow Peeps. Place them in a saucepan and add 2 Tb of cream. Heat with stirring until dissolved. Allow to cool so the sauce doesn’t melt the candy.
  6. Spread a couple of tablespoons of this mock Hollandaise on each “egg” and serve at once with a sly grin.
Delicious bagels you can make yourself

Delicious bagels you can make yourself

Really good bagels are hard to find outside of major East Coast cities. So we decided to tackle making our own, starting with Alex Baldinger and Becky Krystal’s recipe published about a year ago in the Washington Post.

There are only a couple of ingredients you need:  King Arthur Bread Flour (available at most supermarkets) and barley malt syrup (which you may have to order). It is this malt syrup that gives bagels their characteristic flavor, so don’t leave it out. Both Trader Joe’s and Whole Foods carry it, however.

The third major ingredient is rapid rise yeast, not the conventional yeast you may have in your cupboard. And it is important that you proof the yeast before using, as age and mishandling may have more or less killed it. Our first package (Bob’s), purchased at Stop and Shop did not foam up at all, nor did the packet we had in our cupboard, dated May, 2017. We bought some new Fleischman’s Rapid Rise to make these bagels.

The overall procedure is pretty simple: mix up the dough, let it rest and roll it into bagels and let them rest in the refrigerator overnight.  Boil them and add toppings. Then bake them on a piece of baking parchment on a baking stone in a 450° F oven.

  • 1 packet rapid rise yeast
  • 1 pinch of sugar
  • 337 g warm water at 80° F (this is just under 1 ½ cups)
  • 623 g bread flour (a little under 4 cups)
  • 2 tsp salt
  • 1 Tb plus 1 tsp barley malt syrup
  • 3 Tb cornmeal for dusting the chilling platter
  1. Mix the yeast, water and sugar and let it stand until it begins to foam. If it doesn’t foam in 5-10 minutes, get new yeast.
  2. Add the flour, salt and malt syrup to the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a dough hook.
  3. Add the yeast mixture and mix slowly for about 4 minutes, and then at medium speed for about 7 more minutes, until the dough has gathered into a smooth ball.
  4. Sprinkle a small baking sheet with corn meal.
  5. Divide the dough into 8 balls. The WP recipe suggested 4-oz balls, and that made 8 4 -oz balls and one 3-oz ball. So, by simple math, if you make each ball 4.38 oz, you should get 8 dough balls.
  6. Place the balls on the cookie sheet and cover with plastic wrap. Let rest for 5 minutes.
  1. Roll each ball between your hands into an 11-inch tube, avoiding letting the ends taper.
  2. Fasten the ends together using a bit of water to press them together.
  3. Cover the incipient bagels with plastic wrap and place them in the refrigerator overnight, for 12-18 hours.
  1. In the morning, put the baking stone (pizza stone) in the oven and preheat it to 450°F. Let it heat up for 30-60 minutes.
  2. Meanwhile, put a large pan of water on the stove, and boil the bagels, 2-3 at a time for about 30 seconds. Drain them on a rack, and roll them in any toppings you like: sesame seeds, poppy seeds, Kosher salt, minced garlic or minced onion. An “everything” bagel has all these ingredients, plus caraway seeds. Put each topping on a plate and roll the bagel in it.

on peel

  1. Place 3 or 4 bagels on a sheet of baking parchment, on a baking peel or the bottom of a baking sheet, and slide them onto the baking stone.
  2. Bake 12-18 minutes. We baked ours for 14, and while they were delicious we might try adding 2 more minutes next time, as the interiors were a bit softer than we prefer. However, toasting them solved that.

ToppingsThe end result of this project is some of the best bagels we’ve ever made. Our only complaint is how expensive the toppings are at the supermarket, about $5 each. We’d order them in bulk next time. We tried a salt bagel using Diamond Kosher salt, and finding the crystals rather small, we also tried a jar of sea salt, where the crystals were probably too big. We’ll look for salt with a somewhat smaller crystal size next time.

Not only was making these bagels fun for us, it would make a great project for kids as well.